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Myths about Diet

Myth

Low-fat or no-fat diets are good for you.

Fact

People tend to think they need a low-fat diet to lose weight, but you should still have a third of your calories coming from fat.The body needs fat for energy, tissue repair and to transport vitamins A, D, E and K around the body. There's no need to follow a fat-free diet. Cutting down on saturated fats and eating unsaturated fats, found in things like olive oil and avocados, will help.

Myth

Crash dieting or fasting makes you lose weight.

Fact

This may be true in the short term, but ultimately it can hinder weight loss. Losing weight over the long term burns off fat. Crash dieting or fasting not only removes fat but also lean muscle and tissue. The loss of lean muscle causes a fall in your basal metabolic rate - the amount of calories your body needs on a daily basis. This means your body will need fewer calories than it did previously, making weight gain more likely once you stop dieting. Itís also why exercise is recommended in any weight-loss plan to build muscle and maintain your metabolic rate.

Myth

Food eaten late at night is more fattening.

Fact

Many diets tell you not to eat after a certain time in the evening. They say the body will store more fat because it is not burned off with any activity.

It's not when you eat that's important, but the total amount you consume in a 24-hour period.

It is true that people who skip meals during the day, then eat loads in the evening are more likely to be overweight than those who eat regularly throughout the day. This may be because eating regular meals helps people regulate their appetite and overall food intake.

Myth

A slow metabolism prevents weight loss.

Fact

This is a common myth among dieters who are struggling to lose weight. Studies have shown that resting metabolism - the number of calories used by the body at rest - increases as people become fatter. In other words, the larger you are, the more calories you need to keep your body going and the higher your metabolism. Weight gain occurs when the number of calories eaten is greater than the number used up by the body.

Myth

Fattening foods equal rapid weight gain.

Fact

Believe it or not, true weight gain is a slow process. You need to eat an extra 3500 calories to gain one pound of body fat (and vice versa for losing it).

Myth

Low-fat milk has less calcium than full-fat milk.

Fact

Skimmed and semi-skimmed milk actually have more calcium, because the calcium is in the watery part, not the creamy part.If you're trying to lose weight and cut fat from your diet, skimmed milk is your best bet because it is lower in fat and has 10mg more calcium per 200ml milk than full fat.

Myth

Low-fat foods help you lose weight.

Fact

'Low-fat' or 'fat-free' doesn't necessarily mean low calorie or calorie-free. Check the calorie content of foods, especially cakes, biscuits, crisps, ice creams and ready meals. Extra sugars and thickeners are often added to boost flavor and texture, so calorie content may be only a bit less, or similar to standard products.Foods labelled low-fat should contain no more than 3g fat per 100g.

Myth

Cholesterol is bad for you.

Fact

Cholesterol is a fatty substance that is made mostly by the liver.

It can be bad for us, because it forms deposits that line and clog our arteries. Clogged arteries contribute to heart disease. But we all need some blood cholesterol because it's used to build cells and make vital hormones - and there's good and bad cholesterol. 'High density lipoprotein (HDL), or 'good' cholesterol, transports cholesterol away from the arteries, back to the liver. So choose unsaturated fats such as vegetable oils, nuts and seeds.

Myth

Banana are fattening

Fact

Bananas are low in fat and are packed with potassium.There is only 0.5g fat and 95 calories in a banana.

Myth

Vegetarians can't build muscle.

Fact

Vegetarians can be as muscular as meat eaters by getting their protein from vegetable sources such as cheese, nuts, pulses and grains.The body can only store a certain amount of protein, so too much can damage the kidney.

Myth

You always gain weight when you stop smoking.

Fact

Some people gain weight when they stop smoking, some lose weight and some stay the same. While nicotine does increase the body's metabolism, its effect is small. It's far healthier to be an overweight non-smoker than not bother giving up because you think you'll put on weight.

Where people tend to fall down is when they replace a cigarette with comfort food. Chewing sugar-free gum or snacking on vegetable strips kept in the fridge is a good idea because you can have these instead of reaching for the biscuit tin.


List of Top Dietitians by Region

Central Delhi

South Delhi

North Delhi

East Delhi

West Delhi

Gurgaon

Faridabad

Noida


List of Top Diet Topics

Anorexia Nervosa

Binge Eating

Bulimia

Diabetic Diet

Digestive System

Eating Out

Food Allergy

Heart Healthy Diet

Macronutrients

Myths about Diet

Organic Food

Sample Diets

Top Diet Tips

Vegetarian Diet

Vitamins/Minerals

Water

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